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History & Social Sciences

High School

The principal mission of the History & Social Science department is to prepare students to be informed citizens of the school, the community, the nation, and the world. In order to realize this goal, the department offers a broad range of courses in World History and United States History, government, and the social sciences. Within the context of these courses, the department seeks to promote cultural literacy and the free exchange of ideas, while nurturing an appreciation of multiple perspectives in the spirit of mutual understanding. Use of appropriate technology is encouraged at all levels.

Courses

Program of Studies for History & Social Sciences

Modern World History (CP -11211/11222), (H -11311/11322)

(2) Semester Course: 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 9 

Prerequisites:  None

This course in Modern World History is intended to help students learn about the the processes that have shaped today’s world. While studying 19th and 20th centuries, students will develop a foundational understanding of the political spectrum, appreciate the effects of industrialization, and analyze a variety of factors that influence interactions among societies. During the first semester we will investigate how nationalism, competition, and the lack of self-determination influenced conflict.  Throughout the second semester we discuss the extent to which economic development, international cooperation, and self-determination can be utilized to create and maintain peace. It is hoped that students leave the course better able to understand the world in which they live In addition to the course content, this course develops students’ writing skills, reading comprehension and analytical skills, as well as strategies for effective research. This is done by engaging with a variety of primary and secondary source documents so that students can develop confidence in creating their own understandings.  


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Political Revolutions
Industrial Revolution
Imperialism in Asia (China & India)
Imperialism In Africa
World War 1
Causes of World War II
World War II & War Crimes Trial
The Cold War (1945-1991)
Contemporary Global Issues (1991- present)

US History I (CP-13321/13322), (H -13331/13332)

(2) Semester Course: 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 10 

Prerequisites:  Modern World History

This discussion and activity-based course explores United States History from the early Colonial Era (1620) to the end of Reconstruction (1876). In the first half of the course, units of study include, Colonial America; The Revolutionary Era; The Constitution and Critical Period; and The Early Republic.  In the second half of the course, units of study include, Nationalism and Sectionalism; Jacksonian Democracy and Reform; Manifest Destiny; the Civil War and Reconstruction; and The Gilded Age.

A major focus of the course is on themes and issues that endure across American History -  

What is the role of government in an economy and in the lives of its citizens? What is the ideal balance between the Federal and State governments? To what extent does America live up to the values and principles stated in the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution? How should the government balance the rights of the individual in relation to the rights of the group? How does a country pursue its national interests while respecting the diversity of the continent?

Throughout the course, students analyze primary source documents, photographs and political cartoons, participate in debates and discussion seminars and attempt to draw connections between America’s history and events of today, with the goal of learning and applying some “lessons of history”.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Colonial America
Revolutionary America
Constitution and First Presidency
Early Republic and Nationalism
Development of Sectionalism
Reforming America
Causes of the Civil War
The Civil War and Reconstruction

Advanced Placement US History I (AP) -13411/13412

(2) Semester Course: 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 10

Prerequisites:  Modern World History and teacher recommendation

The first part of a two-year sequence, this course is taught at a college level and follows the Advanced Placement United States History curriculum. Students will be prepared for and are expected to take the Advanced Placement United States History Examination in May of their junior year, which may allow them to be awarded credit or a course waiver in college. This course covers a broad range of political, social, economic, and cultural trends from Pre-Columbian origins through the end of the nineteenth century.

In addition to historical content, emphasis is placed on the development of historical reasoning skills and disciplinary practices. The intent is “to encourage students to become apprentice historians who are able to use historical facts and evidence in the service of creating deeper conceptual understandings of critical developments in US History.” Due to the vast amount of material that must be covered, the pace is rigorous, and homework is consistent. Students are required to read a college text and a variety of challenging supplementary materials including primary sources and the writings of major historians. A great deal of emphasis is placed on student initiative and independence, and class time and assessments focus primarily on sophisticated analysis.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
The Opening of the Transatlantic World (1491-1607)
British North America (1607-1763)
American Revolution and Republic (1754-1800)
Growth and Transformation of the American Republic (1800-1844)
Creating and Preserving a Nation

US History II (CP -13421/13422), (H -13431/13432)

(2) Semester Course: 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 11 

Prerequisites:  US History I

This discussion and activity-based course explores United States History from the late 19th century to the present. Units of study include, The Gilded Age; The Progressive Era; America Emerging as a World Power; America and World War I; The 1920’s in America; The Great Depression and the New Deal; America and World War II; The Early Cold War and the 1950’s; The Great Society and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s; The Vietnam and Watergate Eras; The Resurgence of Conservatism; The 1990’s in America; and America in the 21st Century.

A major focus of the course is on themes and issues that endure across American History -

What is the role of government in an economy and in the lives of its citizens? What is it to be a just society? To what extent does America live up to the values and principles stated in  the Declaration of independence and the US Constitution? How do we balance the rights of the individual in relation to the rights of the group? How does a country pursue its national interests in an increasingly globalized world? To what extent is war effective as an instrument of public policy?

Throughout the course, students analyze primary source documents, photographs and political cartoons, participate in debates and discussion seminars and attempt to draw connections between America’s history and events of today, with the goal of learning and applying some “lessons of history”.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
The Gilded Age
The Progressive Era
Imperialism
America and World War I
The 1920’s
The Depression and the New Deal
America and World War II
Postwar America - The Early Cold War and the 1950’s in America
The Great Society
The Civil Rights Movement
The Vietnam War
America in Crisis
Revival of Conservatism
Modern America

Advanced Placement US History II (AP) -134111/134122

(2) Semester Course 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 11 

Prerequisites:  US History I and teacher recommendation

The second part of a two-year sequence, this course is taught at a college level and follows the Advanced Placement United States History curriculum. Students will be prepared for and are expected to take the Advanced Placement United States History Examination in May, which may allow them to be awarded credit or a course waiver in college. The course covers a broad range of political, social, economic, and cultural trends from the Gilded Age of the late 19th century through 21st century trends in American society and politics.

In addition to historical content, emphasis is placed on the development of historical reasoning skills and disciplinary practices. The intent is “to encourage students to become apprentice historians who are able to use historical facts and evidence in the service of creating deeper conceptual understandings of critical developments in US History.” Due to the vast amount of material that must be covered, the pace is rigorous, and homework is consistent. Students are required to read a college text and a variety of challenging supplementary materials including primary sources and the writings of major historians. A great deal of emphasis is placed on student initiative and independence, and class time and assessments focus primarily on sophisticated analysis.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Industrializing America (1865-1898)
Domestic and Global Challenges (1890-1945)
The Modern State and the Age of Liberalism (1945-1980)
Global Capitalism: The End of the American Century, and A New American Course (1980-2019)

Advanced Placement World History (AP) -1151/1152

(2) Semester Course 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grades 10-12 

Prerequisites:  Teacher recommendation

AP World History takes a “big picture” approach to studying the development of and interaction between societies around the globe.  This approach focuses less on fine details and allows students to better understand the arc of human history through understanding larger themes and broad trends over time.  The course asks students to analyze how different themes have continued to influence human history, but how those influences have evolved and changed over time. Comparative analysis is a regular aspect of the course, as is the use of primary and secondary sources.

Advanced Placement World History is a college-level course open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors that prepares students to take the national Advanced Placement Examination in May of each year which may allow them to be awarded credit or a course waiver in college.  Numerous short papers and essay are assigned.  Classroom participation is a must.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
The Global Tapestry c. 1200 - c. 1450
Networks of Exchange c. 1200 - c. 1450
Land-Based Empires c. 1450 - c. 1750
Transoceanic Interconnection c. 1450 - c. 1750
Revolutions c. 1750 - c. 1900
Consequences of Industrialization c. 1750 - c. 1900
Global Conflict c. 1900 - Present
Cold War and Decolonization c. 1900 - Present
Globalization c. 1900 - Present

Facing History and Ourselves (CP -1390), (H -1392)

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to:  Grades 10-12 

Prerequisites:  None

This multidisciplinary course applies themes from history, political science, economics, sociology and psychology in investigating how societies can subtly support and sometimes actively participate in genocide. The course focuses on the Nazi Holocaust as a primary case study, but students will also examine other historical genocides. The study of racism, anti-semitism and prejudice will also invite exploration of issues of justice, individual choice and responsibility and the creation of inclusive, humane societies.

This course is highly interactive and is built around discussions and written reflections based on a variety of sources. Students will be encouraged to make connections between events in history and the moral choices they make in their own lives. The curriculum from the national nonprofit organization Facing History and Ourselves serves as a guide for the course progression.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Hitler’s Rise to Power
The Holocaust
Genocide
America and Facing History

Human Geography -1140

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to: Grades 10-12                                                                    

Prerequisites: None

This course will introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students apply spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the 2012 National Geography Standards.

This course may serve as preparation for an upcoming Advanced Placement course on Human Geography.

Advanced Placement US Gov. and Politics (AP) -1441/1442

(2) Semester Course 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 12

Prerequisites:  Teacher recommendation

A student who envisions taking Advanced Placement US Government and Politics may take the one-semester course entitled Law in America, but may not take that course concurrent with Advanced Placement Government.

Advanced Placement US Government and Politics is a college-level course open to seniors. The course prepares students to take the national Advanced Placement Examination in May of each school year, which may allow them to be awarded credit or a course waiver in college. Course topics include the constitutional underpinnings of United States Government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media, institutions of national government, public policy, civil rights and civil liberties.  In this course, a great deal of emphasis is placed on student initiative and scholarship.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Foundations of American Democracy
Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
American Political Culture and Beliefs
Political Participation
Interaction Among Branches

Law in America (CP -1412), (H -14130)

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to:  Grades 11-12 

Prerequisites:  None

A student who envisions taking Advanced Placement US Government and Politics may take this course, but not concurrent with Advanced Placement Government.

This one-semester introductory law class examines jurisprudence (“The philosophy and science of law”) in the context of, 1) constitutional law, 2) the role of the three branches of government in creating, interpreting and enforcing laws, 3) civil rights and civil liberties, 4) criminal law and the criminal justice system, and 5) civil law. Students will participate in numerous classroom activities, including informal discussions, formal Socratic Seminars and the research and dissection of actual court cases. As time allows, current events pertaining to issues of law in America will be explored.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Jurisprudence - An Introduction to the Basics of Law
Foundations of Constitutional Law
Three Branches of US Government
Criminal Law, Civil Law, Criminal Defenses

Advanced Placement Psychology (AP) -13711/13712

(2) Semester Course 2.5 credits/semester

Open to:  Grade 12 

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation

A student who envisions taking Advanced Placement Psychology should not take the Introduction to Psychology course

Advanced Placement Psychology is designed to replicate a college introductory psychology class. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Psychology Examination, which may allow them to be awarded credit or a course waiver in college.  The expectation is that all students will take that examination, administered in May of each year. Topics include: Research Methodology; The Biological Foundations of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; States of Consciousness; Learning Theory; Memory; Thought and Language; Developmental Psychology; Motivation and Emotion; Personality Theory; Assessment and Individual Differences; Abnormal Psychology; Treatment of Psychological Disorders; and Social Psychology.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Research Methodology and Statistics
Biological Bases of Behavior
Sensation and Perception
States of Consciousness
Learning Theory
Cognition: Memory, Thought, Language
Developmental Psychology
Motivation and Emotion
Personality Theory
Testing and Individual Differences
Abnormal Psychology
Treatment
Social Psychology

Introduction to Psychology (CP) -1370

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to:  Grades 11-12 

Prerequisites:  None

A student who envisions taking Advanced Placement Psychology should not take the Introduction to Psychology course.

In this course students will receive a wide-ranging introduction to psychology - the systematic study of human behavior and mental processes. Students are encouraged to actively participate on a daily basis; this is a discussion and demonstration based course. Topics include: Research Methodology, The Biological Foundations of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; States of Consciousness; Learning Theory; Memory; Thought and Language; Developmental Psychology; Motivation and Emotion; Personality Theory; Assessment and Individual Differences; Abnormal Psychology; Treatment of Psychological Disorders; and, Social Psychology. Time permitting, students may also examine elements of Sports Psychology, Industrial and Organizational Psychology and other selected topics.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Research Methodology
Biological Bases of Behavior
Sensation and Perception
Sleep and Dreams
Memory
Abnormal Psychology

Introduction to Sociology (H) 1338

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to:  Grades 11-12 

Prerequisites:  None

In this course students undertake the systematic study of human society and social interaction. This is a discussion and demonstration driven course that requires active student participation. Students will be consistently asked to think like a sociologist. Topics include, Social Science Theory and Methodology; The Development of Identity; Social Behavior and Interaction; Socialization; Cultural Differences and Commonalities; Social Control and Deviance; Social Inequality; and other selected topics.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Perspectives and Research Methods
Culture
Socialization and Group Behavior
Deviance
Social Inequality

Time to Think - Human Judgment, Reasoning, and Decision Making (H) -1460

Semester Course 2.5 credits

Open to:  Grades 9-11

Prerequisites:  Teacher recommendation

At a time when informed critical thinking is more important than ever, it seems essential to set aside some regular time to think. This course will combine elements of Philosophy, Cognitive Psychology, Critical and Creative Thinking, and Rhetoric to explore what sound thinking is, and isn’t. Units of study include: Intelligence; Arguments, Claims and Evidence; Errors and Fallacies in Reasoning; Lying and Persuasion; Creative Thinking and Aesthetics; Moral Reasoning; and Thinking About the Future. The course is designed to have academic applications across disciplines, and to empower students to be more engaged, reflective, and thoughtful citizens.

Clear expression of one’s ideas, both verbally and in writing, is a major component of the course. This elective is designed for students who actively want to improve and refine those skills.


Curriculum Units and Learning Outcomes:
Intelligence
Arguments, Claims, Evidence
Errors & Fallacies in Reasoning
Lying and Persuasion
Creative Thinking and Aesthetics
Moral Reasoning

Contact Us

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Michael Sullivan

Titles: History Teacher, History Department SML
Locations: Hopkinton High School
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Shannon Allberry-Yerardi

Titles: History Teacher, Varsity Softball Coach
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Mason Challinor

Titles: History Teacher, Freshman Boys Soccer Coach
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Colleen Cormier

Titles: History Teacher
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Kenneth Gates

Titles: History Teacher, JV Boys Lacrosse Coach
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Jennifer Griffey

Titles: History Teacher
Locations: Hopkinton High School
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Michael Hamilton

Titles: History Teacher
Locations: Hopkinton High School
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Brett Mulvey

Titles: History Teacher
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Shannon Oles

Titles: Teacher Grade 8
Locations: Hopkinton Middle School
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Brian Prescott

Titles: History Teacher, Boys JV Soccer Coach, Varsity Boys Spring Track Coach
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